France: Social Distancing ‘Dog Collars’ Deployed for Factory Workers

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Essity, a Swedish manufacturer of tissue paper, baby diapers, and feminine-care products, located in France, is being accused of treating their employees like dogs, because the company requires its workers to wear a social distancing device that emits a loud sound if they are too close to each other. Amazon is reported to have experimented with such technology in their warehouses and Hitachi has developed similar technology. China is already linking coronavirus rules to its onerous social credit score system, so the idea that people could be publicly shamed or punished for getting too close to others is a very real possibility. -GEG

Factory workers in France have labeled social distancing ‘dog collars’ as an “attack on individual liberty” as employers are trying to make them wear the devices to enforce restrictions while working.

The alarm devices emit a noise and light up if workers get closer than two metres together, but have been slammed by a worker’s union for “infantilising” employees.

The alarms are scheduled to be introduced by hygiene company Essity, which wants it’s factory workers to wear them around their necks.

The CFDT union told AFP that it is “a system comparable to ones that try to dissuade dogs from barking.”

Factory workers in France have labeled social distancing ‘dog collars’ as an “attack on individual liberty” as employers are trying to make them wear the devices to enforce restrictions while working.

The alarm devices emit a noise and light up if workers get closer than two metres together, but have been slammed by a worker’s union for “infantilising” employees.

The alarms are scheduled to be introduced by hygiene company Essity, which wants it’s factory workers to wear them around their necks.

The CFDT union told AFP that it is “a system comparable to ones that try to dissuade dogs from barking.”

Christine Duguet, a union representative from the CFDT, suggested that the devices will “finish in the rubbish bins or stay in a cupboard,” adding “This is complete nonsense.”

Duguet also expressed concerns that the company would attempt to keep the system in place as a ‘security measure’ even after the pandemic ends.

The device is manufactured by a Belgian company called Phi Data, which also offers a similar device that can be activated by the wearer if they feel someone comes too close to them.

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Zorro
Zorro
1 year ago

Next step: electric shock. That’s how the dog collars work to try to keep a dog from leaving a property without fencing.

Marti Maurer
Marti Maurer
1 year ago

This is about control and is absolutely ridiculous!!