Migrants’ Remittances to Mexico and Central America Jump to $53 Billion in 2018

Pixabay
image_pdfimage_print


The World Bank reported that legal and illegal immigrants sent $53.4 billion in remittances to Mexico and Central America in 2018. Remittances to Mexico reached $33.7 billion in 2018, up 21% from 2016, and the outflow to Central America rose to $19.7 billion in 2018, up 25% from 2016. These money transfers provide a huge stimulus to the countries that export their populations to the U.S. labor market. -GEG

Legal and illegal migrants sent $53.4 billion in remittances back to Mexico and Central America in 2018, or more than double the cost of building a border barrier on the U.S.-Mexico border, according to a World Bank report.

Remittances to Mexico reached $33.7 billion in 2018, up 21 percent from roughly $27.8 billion in 2016, the bank reported.

Remittances from the three Central Americans countries are being spiked by the growing inflow of asylum-seeking migrants into blue-collar jobs throughout the U.S. economy, via the border’s catch-and-release laws. The outflow to Central America rose to $19.7 billion in 2018, up from $15.8 billion in 2016, according to the bank.

The outflow to Central America rose 25 percent in just two years.

GOP legislators have urged Congress to pay for the $22 billion border wall by taxing migrants’ remittances.

The money sent back from the United States to Central America includes many migrants’ payments to the cartels who traffic them into the U.S. economy. The trafficking debts can start at $5,000 per head.

The remittances provide a huge stimulus to the countries that export their populations to the U.S. labor market. But that stimulus also imposes huge economic costs, including civic turmoil, poverty, high rates of crime, and loss of foreign investment.

The Guardian reported from Guatemala:

In impoverished villages such as Yalambojoch, agriculture is the only work available.

Such grinding poverty makes emigration an attractive alternative, according to the town’s mayor, Lucas Pérez. “People leave our village, find work in the US and send money to help their relatives,” said Pérez, who estimated about 200 people from the tiny village live in the United States.

The surrounding Huehuetenango province sends the largest number of migrants from the country, according to Guatemala’s foreign ministry, and evidence of the exodus is clear: Yalambojoch has no potable water or electricity, but among the wooden shacks are modern two-story houses with tiled roofs – built with remittance money from abroad.

Read full article here…

 

Visit our Classified ads.

Check out our Classified ads at the bottom of this page.

Recent stories & commentary

Freedom

Is a “Climate Lockdown” on Its Way?

June 16, 2021 Off-Guardian 0

An article by a WHO employee suggests that lockdowns will be reused when globalists move away from their pandemic narrative and focus on climate change. Private-vehicle use will be limited, red meat will be banned, and fossil-fuel companies will have to stop drilling under the plan.

Politics

Los Angeles Sheriff Fed Up with Failed Homeless Policies: It’s Insanity

June 13, 2021 Fox News 1

Homicide has increased 186% since last year. Residents and business owners have complained of dangerous conditions in Venice Beach stemming from the encampments, including shootings, fires, explosions, littering, drug use, harassment and assault. Local leaders who created the problem oppose the sheriff’s patrols.

Health

CDC Calls “Emergency Meeting” After Reports of Heart Inflammation Following Vaccination. Germany Advises Against Covid Shots in Young People.

The CDC has called for an “emergency meeting” following 573 reports of myocarditis inflammation of the heart in people vaccinated with the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines. The CDC recently said it would launch an investigation into a link between the vaccine and several cases of heart inflammation in vaccinated adolescents.

Classifieds

For classified advertising rates and terms, click here. The appearance of ads on this site does not signify endorsement by the publisher. We do not attempt to verify the accuracy of statements made therein or vouch for the integrity of advertisers. However, we will investigate complaints from readers and remove any message we find to be misleading or that promotes anything fraudulent, illegal, or unethical.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments