Stanford University Cures Cancer with Vaccine in Mice Experiments

Wiki
image_pdf
  • Save
image_print
  • Save
Dr. Ronald Levy of Stanford University is reporting that a vaccine using two immune stimulators to target tumors in mice cured 87 out of 90 mice in the first effort.  After injecting a combination of two immune boosters directly into mouse tumors, the research team said that all traces of the specifically targeted cancer were eliminated from the animal’s entire body.  [This is great news, not only because it appears to be effective, but because immune stimulators, if they are taken from nature, should be very inexpensive to mass produce.  However, if the pharmaceutical industry follows true to form, the ‘vaccine’ will be absurdly expensive. We shall see.] -GEG

A new cancer treatment experiment at Stanford University that used immune-stimulators to target tumors in mice had remarkably encouraging results.

After injecting a combination of two immune boosters directly into solid mouse tumors, the research team said the vaccination eliminated all traces of the specifically targeted cancer from the animal’s entire body — including metastases that were previously untreated.

“When we use these two agents together, we see the elimination of tumors all over the body,” senior author of the study, Dr. Ronald Levy told the Stanford Medicine News Center. “This approach bypasses the need to identify tumor-specific immune targets and doesn’t require wholesale activation of the immune system or customization of a patient’s immune cells.”

Out of the two immune “agents” used in the study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine, one has already been approved for use in humans and the second is currently involved in a lymphoma treatment trial.

The study explained that when an immune system detects cancer cells in the body, its T cells attack the tumor but, over time, the tumor devises ways to overpower the immune cells and continues to grow.

In Levy’s experiment, the cancer-fighting T cells from the immune system were rejuvenated when a microgram (one-millionth of a gram) amount of the two immune boosters was injected into a mouse’s lymphoma tumor. Those same cells then moved on from the tumor it destroyed to find any other identical cancers in the body. Although the injection was successful in eliminating the targeted tumors present in the mouse, the T cells did not move on to a colon cancer tumor also found in the animal.

“This is a very targeted approach,” Levy said. “Only the tumor that shares the protein targets displayed by the treated site is affected. We’re attacking specific targets without having to identify exactly what proteins the T cells are recognizing.”

The experiment was replicated in 90 other mice and was successful in eradicating the tumors in 87 of them, allowing the researchers to declare them cancer-free. The cancer did recur in three of the animals, but the tumors later regressed after another round of immune treatment. The study was also successful in mice that had breast, colon and melanoma tumors.


Read full article here…

Visit our Classified ads.

Check out our Classified ads at the bottom of this page.

Recent stories & commentary

  • Save
Money

Stock Market Losses Wipe Out $9 Trillion from Americans’ Wealth

September 30, 2022 CNBC 2

The top 1% lost over $5 trillion in stock market wealth. The market was inflated as it nearly doubled during the pandemic, rising from $22 trillion to $42 trillion. The bulk of that wealth went to those at the top, since the wealthiest 10% of Americans own 89% of individually held stocks.

  • Save
Health

Rat Feeding Study Shows ‘Impossible Burger’ May Not Be Safe to Eat

September 30, 2022 GM Watch 2

Rats fed Impossible Burger’s GM yeast-derived protein developed unexplained changes in weight gain, changes in the blood that can indicate the onset of inflammation or kidney disease, and possible signs of anemia. The he FDA issued a “no questions” letter which is not an assertion by the FDA that the food is safe.

Classifieds

For classified advertising rates and terms, click here. The appearance of ads on this site does not signify endorsement by the publisher. We do not attempt to verify the accuracy of statements made therein or vouch for the integrity of advertisers. However, we will investigate complaints from readers and remove any message we find to be misleading or that promotes anything fraudulent, illegal, or unethical.

Subscribe
Notify of
guest
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments