California’s Public Health Director Quits After Test Reporting Glitch

On Sunday, California’s public health director, Dr. Sonia Angell, quit without explanation following a technical ‘glitch’ that caused up to 300,000 records to be backlogged — although not all are coronavirus test results and some may be duplicates. This resulted in a delay in reporting virus test results, and information used to make decisions about reopening businesses and schools. A review by the Kaiser Health News service and the Associated Press finds at least 49 state and local public health leaders have resigned, retired or been fired since April across 23 states.

Public health leaders from Dr. Anthony Fauci down to officials in small communities have reported death threats and intimidation that includes armed protesters at the home of Ohio state’s health director. Some have seen their home addresses published or have been the subject of attacks on social media.

Vilified, threatened with violence and in some cases suffering from burnout, dozens of state and local public health officials around the U.S. have resigned or have been fired amid the coronavirus outbreak, a testament to how politically combustible masks, lockdowns and infection data have become.

One of the latest departures came Sunday, when California’s public health director, Dr. Sonia Angell, quit without explanation following a technical glitch that caused a delay in reporting virus test results — information used to make decisions about reopening businesses and schools.

Last week, New York City’s health commissioner was replaced after months of friction with the Police Department and City Hall.

A review by the Kaiser Health News service and the Associated Press finds at least 49 state and local public health leaders have resigned, retired or been fired since April across 23 states. The list has grown by more than 20 people since the AP and KHN started keeping track in June.

The departures are making a bad situation worse, at a time when the U.S. needs good public health leadership the most, said Lori Tremmel Freeman, CEO of the National Association of County and City Health Officials.

“We’re moving at breakneck speed here to stop a pandemic, and you can’t afford to hit the pause button and say, ‘We’re going to change the leadership around here and we’ll get back to you after we hire somebody,’” Freeman said.

As of Monday, confirmed infections in the United States stood at over 5 million, with deaths topping 163,000, the highest in the world, according to the count kept by Johns Hopkins University.

Many of the firings and resignations have to do with conflicts over mask orders or social distancing, Freeman said. Many politicians and ordinary Americans have argued that such measures are not needed, contrary to the scientific evidence and the advice of health experts.

“It’s not a health divide; it’s a political divide,” Freeman said.

Some health officials said they were stepping down for family reasons, and some left for jobs at other agencies, such as the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Some were ousted because of what higher-ups said was poor leadership or a failure to do their job.

Read full article here…

Additional source:

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/dr-sonia-angell-california-top-public-health-official-resigns-coronavirus-data-glitch/




Portland Prosecutor Likely To Drop Charges Against Rioters Who Injure Cops

Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that he is refusing to prosecute most crimes by rioters including interfering with an officer, disorderly conduct. criminal trespass, harassment, escape in the 3rd degree, and riot. Attacks on police officers and resisting arrest will be scrutinized based on whether police caused rioters to react because they used tear gas or other crowd-control measures causing rioters to “instinctively lash out.” The city is at 75 days of riots and now most of the rioters won’t see the inside of a courtroom much less the inside of a jail cell. That means there will be no disincentive to rioting. Portland will suffer greatly. -GEG

Well, we’ve heard it all now. Rioters have been given what is tantamount to carte blanche in Portland. It’s open season on Portlanders, open season on cops, and open season on the rule of law.

Scores of the 500 people who were arrested during the nearly 75 days of violent Portland riots will have their charges dropped by the new Black Lives Matter-approved district attorney.

Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt announced that his default position is not to prosecute and that most crimes by rioters will be forgiven and forgotten.

That list of crimes includes interfering with a police officer, disorderly conduct, and rioting.

  • interfering with a police officer
  • disorderly conduct
  • criminal trespass
  • harassment
  • escape in the 3rd degree
  • riot (sometimes in some circumstances)

Attacks on police officers and resisting arrest will be scrutinized based on whether – and we’re not making this up – police caused rioters to react because they used tear gas or other crowd-control measures causing rioters to “instinctively lash out.”

…the instinctive reaction of people who have been gassed repeatedly, who have been struck with kinetic projectile weapons, and who have seen other protestors arrested in ways they deeply disapprove of.

He told Oregon Public Broadcasting that “his attorneys will scrutinize every case to determine if the person’s intent was to resist arrest or injure a police officer.”

That’s right. Schmidt basically said that if an assault on a police officer or resisting arrest occurred when police were clearing an area with tear gas, for example, that he would consider dropping those charges.

[We’ll take] a particularly hard look at resisting arrest and assault of a public safety officer if those cases occurred when an individual was being tear gassed or otherwise exposed to a use of force at the time of the resistance.

His staff plans to determine the intent with which the rioter used violence to determine whether he or she is worthy of prosecution or “restorative justice.

He told the local taxpayer-funded radio station that “the presumption on a lot of these cases that are listed out there is that we won’t prosecute… But if there are egregious circumstances or something about the case that stands out, we can always choose to prosecute.”

Read full article here…