Justin Trudeau Threatens ‘Consequences’ If Social Media Sites Don’t Ban ‘Hate Speech’


Canadian Prime Minister Trudeau threatened social media platforms with “consequences” and “meaningful penalties” if they don’t “step up” and ban everything his regime feels is “hate speech” or “disinformation.” Canadians were not fooled and recognized it as censorship and thought control. Hate, violent extremism, and criminality were not defined in order to be able to change the rules at will. -GEG

Canadian
Prime Minister Trudeau on Tuesday threatened social media platforms
with “consequences” and “meaningful penalties” if they don’t “step up”
and ban everything his regime feels is “hate speech” or
“disinformation.”

Social
media platforms must be held accountable for the hate speech &
disinformation we see online – and if they don’t step up, there will be
consequences. We launched Canada’s new Digital Charter today to guide
our decisions, learn more about it here: https://t.co/SH7mpyojsj pic.twitter.com/V2C0TmR49b— Justin Trudeau (@JustinTrudeau) May 21, 2019

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Canada’s new Digital Charter:

The 10 principles of the Charter

1. Universal Access:

All Canadians
will have equal opportunity to participate in the digital world and the
necessary tools to do so, including access, connectivity, literacy and
skills.

2. Safety and Security:

Canadians will
be able to rely on the integrity, authenticity and security of the
services they use and should feel safe online.

3. Control and Consent:

Canadians will
have control over what data they are sharing, who is using their
personal data and for what purposes, and know that their privacy is
protected.

4. Transparency, Portability and Interoperability:

Canadians will
have clear and manageable access to their personal data and should be
free to share or transfer it without undue burden.

5. Open and Modern Digital Government:

Canadians will be able to access modern digital services from the Government of Canada, which are secure and simple to use.

6. A Level Playing Field:

The Government
of Canada will ensure fair competition in the online marketplace to
facilitate the growth of Canadian businesses and affirm Canada’s
leadership on digital and data innovation, while protecting Canadian
consumers from market abuses.

7. Data and Digital for Good:

The Government
of Canada will ensure the ethical use of data to create value, promote
openness and improve the lives of people—at home and around the world.

8. Strong Democracy:

The Government
of Canada will defend freedom of expression and protect against online
threats and disinformation designed to undermine the integrity of
elections and democratic institutions.

9. Free from Hate and Violent Extremism:

Canadians can expect that digital platforms will not foster or disseminate hate, violent extremism or criminal content.

10. Strong Enforcement and Real Accountability:

There will be clear, meaningful penalties for violations of the laws and regulations that support these principles.

https://www.ic.gc.ca/eic/site/062.nsf/eng/h_00108.html




Somali Teens Attack Victims with Hammers in Minnesota. Mainstream Media Remains Silent.


A group of about ten male Somali teenagers armed with hammers attacked and injured several people at a light-rail station near the University of Minnesota and the infamous Little Mogadishu neighborhood. A witness said, “It was a group of Somali young males with hammers and bars. They were attacking anyone who looked like they had money or were white.” The incident took place on Friday, May 17 and has yet to receive coverage by any mainstream news outlet other than Fox News. -GEG

A group of 8-10 Somali teenagers armed with hammers attacked
and injured several people at a rail station in Minnesota on Friday
night.

In Minneapolis Police Department dispatch audio, a report of “a group of 8-10 males chasing people with hammers” was called in.

The attack occurred at the East Bank Light Rail Station near the
University of Minnesota and the infamous Little Mogadishu neighborhood.

“The U of M PD is asking for assistance from Metro Transit and
Minneapolis for a group of 8-10 males at the East Bank Light Rail
station chasing people around with hammers. They do have some people
injured,” the audio confirms.

Below is a report filed by the University of Minnesota police,
showing “a group of Somali juveniles” brandished “metal pipes” and fled
police.

An alleged witness
said, “It was a group of Somali young males with hammers and bars. They
were attacking anyone who looked like they had money or were white.”

“I kinda hurried an older white lady away and walked a few blocks to
catch a bus,” he continued. “They pretty much ignored me but i was in
ratty work clothes and am half arabic. Guess they gave me a pass.”

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Driver’s License Photos of Almost Half of US Adults Now Are Being Used in Virtual Line-Ups by Law Enforcement


Sixteen states allow the FBI to use face-recognition technology to compare the faces of suspected criminals to their driver’s license and ID photos, creating a virtual line-up of their state residents. In addition, state and local police departments across the country are building their own face-recognition systems. Law enforcement networks include over 117-million American adults. It is unknown how this impacts privacy, civil liberties, or even accuracy of results. -GEG

I. Executive Summary

There
is a knock on your door. It’s the police. There was a robbery in your
neighborhood. They have a suspect in custody and an eyewitness. But they
need your help: Will you come down to the station to stand in the
line-up?

Most people would probably answer “no.” This summer, the
Government Accountability Office revealed that close to 64 million
Americans do not have a say in the matter: 16 states let the FBI use
face recognition technology to compare the faces of suspected criminals
to their driver’s license and ID photos, creating a virtual line-up of
their state residents. In this line-up, it’s not a human that points to
the suspect—it’s an algorithm.

But the FBI is only part of the story. Across the country,
state and local police departments are building their own face
recognition systems, many of them more advanced than the FBI’s. We know
very little about these systems. We don’t know how they impact privacy
and civil liberties. We don’t know how they address accuracy problems.
And we don’t know how any of these systems—local, state, or
federal—affect racial and ethnic minorities.

One in two American adults is in a law enforcement face recognition network.

This
report closes these gaps. The result of a year-long investigation and
over 100 records requests to police departments around the country, it
is the most comprehensive survey to date of law enforcement face
recognition and the risks that it poses to privacy, civil liberties, and
civil rights. Combining FBI data with new information we obtained about
state and local systems, we find that law enforcement face recognition
affects over 117 million American adults. It is also unregulated. A few
agencies have instituted meaningful protections to prevent the misuse of
the technology. In many more cases, it is out of control.

The benefits of face recognition are real. It has been used to catch
violent criminals and fugitives. The law enforcement officers who use
the technology are men and women of good faith. They do not want to
invade our privacy or create a police state. They are simply using every
tool available to protect the people that they are sworn to serve.
Police use of face recognition is inevitable. This report does not aim
to stop it.

Rather, this report offers a framework to reason through the very
real risks that face recognition creates. It urges Congress and state
legislatures to address these risks through commonsense regulation
comparable to the Wiretap Act. These reforms must be accompanied by key
actions by law enforcement, the National Institute of Standards and
Technology (NIST), face recognition companies, and community leaders. 

A. Key Findings

Our general findings are set forth below. Specific findings for 25 local and state law enforcement agencies can be found in our Face Recognition Scorecard,whichevaluates
these agencies’ impact on privacy, civil liberties, civil rights,
transparency and accountability. The records underlying all of our
conclusions are available online.
Law enforcement face recognition networks include over 117 million American adults. 

Face
recognition is neither new nor rare. FBI face recognition searches are
more common than federal court-ordered wiretaps. At least one out of
four state or local police departments has the option to run face
recognition searches through their or another agency’s system. At least
26 states (and potentially as many as 30) allow law enforcement to run
or request searches against their databases of driver’s license and ID
photos. Roughly one in two American adults has their photos searched
this way.
Different uses of face recognition create different risks. This report offers a framework to tell them apart.  

A
face recognition search conducted in the field to verify the identity
of someone who has been legally stopped or arrested is different, in
principle and effect, than an investigatory search of an ATM photo
against a driver’s license database, or continuous, real-time scans of
people walking by a surveillance camera. The former is targeted and
public. The latter are generalized and invisible. While some agencies,
like the San Diego Association of Governments, limit themselves to more
targeted use of the technology, others are embracing high and very high
risk deployments.
By tapping into driver’s license databases, the FBI is using biometrics in a way it’s never done before. 

Historically, FBI fingerprint and DNA databases have been primarily or exclusively made up of information from criminal
arrests or investigations. By running face recognition searches against
16 states’ driver’s license photo databases, the FBI has built a
biometric network that primarily includes law-abiding Americans. This is unprecedented and highly problematic.
Major police departments are exploring face recognition on live surveillance video. 

Major
police departments are exploring real-time face recognition on live
surveillance camera video. Real-time face recognition lets police
continuously scan the faces of pedestrians walking by a street
surveillance camera. It may seem like science fiction. It is real.
Contract documents and agency statements show that at least five major
police departments—including agencies in Chicago, Dallas, and Los
Angeles—either claimed to run real-time face recognition off of street
cameras, bought technology that can do so, or expressed a written
interest in buying it. Nearly all major face recognition companies offer
real-time software.
Law enforcement face recognition is unregulated and in many instances out of control. 

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