Austin Bomber Leaves Bombs in Packages, At Least Two People Dead

Austin, Texas: A teenager was killed and at least two women were seriously injured by two bombs that were inside packages left on doorsteps. A man was killed by a similar blast in the same neighborhood two weeks previously. -GEG

 

A teenager was killed and at least two women were seriously injured after a pair of explosions rocked homes in Austin Monday.

The blasts came just two weeks after a another blast, which authorities said is linked to at least one of Monday’s incidents.

Austin Police Chief Brian Manley told Martha MacCallum on “The Story” that there is an elevated skill level being shown by the culprit in building the explosives.

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Professor Bans Male Student from Class for Rejecting the Biology of Transgenderism

An Indiana University Pennsylvania professor barred one of her male students from a class on Christianity for refusing to read a scripted apology for challenging transgender and feminist arguments. He argued that there are only two biological genders and that the wage gap is a false paradigm. If he is not allowed to return to class, he will not graduate on schedule and will be forced to repay federal grant money. [The facts in this story will make you angry- guaranteed!] -GEG

A student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania has been barred from attending a religious studies class required for graduation after pointing out that there are only two genders.

“Later this week I will be defending myself and my FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS in front of the Academic Integrity Board (AIB) of the Indiana Univ. of Pennsylvania (IUP) against allegations of Classroom Conduct violations,” Lake Ingle stated in a Facebook post, which was deleted after Ingle retained legal representation.

“I am fighting to make my voice heard. Not only my voice, but the voices of others that oppose popular university opinion.”   

“The decision made by the AIB that day will determine whether I will be able to continue participating in my full course load, as well as graduate this May as scheduled,” Ingle continued, adding, “This is not transgender, woman’s rights, or wage issue. This is about free speech and the constant misuse of intellectual power in universities.”

According to Ingle, the class was forced to watch a Ted-Talk on February 28 featuring Paula Stone, a transgender woman, who gave examples of “mansplaining,” “male privilege,” and systematic sexism. Following the video, Ingle wrote that the instructor “opened the floor to WOMEN ONLY. Barring men from speaking until the women in the class have had their chance to speak.”

After some time had elapsed, Ingle stated he “took this opportunity to point out the official view of biologists who claim there are only two biological genders,” and refuted the “gender wage gap,” after which class resumed as normal.

“The floor was opened, and not a single woman spoke. Thirty seconds or so passed and still no woman had spoken. So, I decided it was permissible for me to enter the conversation, especially because I felt the conversation itself was completely inappropriate in its structure,” Ingle told Campus Reform. “I objected to the use of the anecdotal accounts of one woman’s experience to begin a discussion in which they were considered reality. It was during my objection that Dr. Downie attempted to silence me because I am not a woman.”

On February 29, Ingle met with his instructor, who he says gave him two documents—an Academic Integrity Referral Form and Documented Agreement. Photos of each document, along with a letter from IUP Provost Dr. Tomothy Moerland, were provided to Campus Reform.

Both the referral form and agreement charge Ingle with “Disrespectful objection to the professor’s class discussion structure; refusal to stop talking out of turn; angry outbursts in response to being required to listen to a trans speaker discuss the reality of white male privilege and sexism; disrespectful references to the validity of trans identity and experience; [and making a] disrespectful claim that a low score on any class work would be evidence of professor’s personal prejudice.”

According to the documented agreement, IUP is now attempting to force Ingle to apologize, stipulating that “Lake will write an apology to the professor which specifically addresses each of the disrespectful behaviors described above.”

Moreover, the agreement proclaims that on March 8, “Lake will begin class with an apology to the class for his behavior and then listen in silence as the professor and/or any student who wishes to speak shares how he or she felt during Lake’s disrespectful and disruptive outbursts on 2-28.”

“The Office of the Provost has received a request from [REDACTED] Instructor for RLST 481 – Special Topic – Self, Sin, and Salvation, to remove you from class due to behaviors that significantly disrupt the learning process in this class,” the letter to Ingle from Provost Moerland states. “Due to the serious nature of the issue, you are barred from attending this class in accordance with the Classroom Disruption policy.”

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Chinese Constitution Changed for President Xi Jinping – No More Term Limits

China’s constitution was amended to wipe term limits off the books for President Xi Jinping who assumed office in 2013 and was due to step down.  Now he may remain in office indefinitely.  China added term limits to the constitution in 1982, after decades of Mao Tse-tung’s disastrous political campaigns underscored the dangers of one-man rule.  Two members of parliament voted against the change and three abstained, giving Xi a 99.8% approval vote.  Very few inside China are brave enough to criticize the change, but Chinese outside the country are vocal in their dissatisfaction. -GEG

On Sunday afternoon, nearly 3,000 delegates to China’s ceremonial parliament cast ballots in Beijing’s Great Hall of the People to amend the nation’s constitution, allowing Xi to potentially remain president well past 2023, when he was due to step down.

The amendment was widely expected — the parliament, called the National People’s Congress, hasn’t voted down a Communist Party decision in its 64-year history. Yet it marks a striking break from precedent. China added term limits to the constitution in 1982, after decades of Mao Tse-tung’s disastrous political campaigns underscored the dangers of one-man rule.

Two delegates voted against the change and three abstained, giving Xi 2,958 votes — a 99.8% approval rate.

Xi probably would have been unhappy with much less, said Willy Lam, an expert on Chinese politics at the Chinese University of Hong Kong who has written a book about the Xi era.

 “This constitutional revision came from him — it is fully his initiative, and it has been controversial within the party and among the people,” he said. “So he needs that extremely high approval reading to show that this is not a selfish initiative — this is not him wanting to become an emperor for life, but this is the will of the people.”

Xi holds three posts: general secretary of the Communist Party, chairman of the Central Military Commission and president of the nation. The last is the least consequential and the only one that carried term limits — China’s last two presidents, Hu Jintao and Jiang Zemin, each stepped down after two five-year terms. State media have cast the revision as a common-sense move to bring the presidency into line with the other two posts.

 Yet Xi’s landslide vote belies a deep anxiety among Chinese intellectuals, students and former officials about the implications of his seemingly limitless power.

Li Rui, a 100-year-old former secretary to Mao, sees parallels between Xi and his former boss. “The Soviet Union collapsed, but China didn’t collapse, because China’s cultural traditions preserved the Communist Party,” Li told the Hong Kong-based newspaper Ming Pao. “A country like China produced people like Mao Tse-tung. Now it gives birth to a Xi Jinping.”

 Chinese students abroad, in a rare show of dissent, have reportedly strewn fliers on campuses showing a photo of Xi superimposed with the words: “Not my president.” Censors have rushed to block open discussion of the revisions on social media sites; on Sina Weibo, China’s version of Twitter, forbidden terms include “reelection,” “proclaiming oneself an emperor” and “I don’t agree.” They have also banned images of Winnie the Pooh, a cartoon character that many Chinese internet users believe shares some of Xi’s features.

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